Tagged: English Wine Week

Wine News 19-26 May

It’s English Wine Week! We’re not sure how we’ll mark the occasion yet, but if you want to find out what’s going on in your area, the English Wine Producers website has all the details.

You could also catch up on Decanter‘s round-up of their latest English wine news and recommendations, or this article about how Britain shaped some of the world’s most famous wines.

In other news, the Champagne Council has launched a new free e-learning programme. We only had a quick look, but it looks as though you answer four questions to determine what level of programme suits you best, and then proceed. It seems to be intended for phones (unless you just like scrolling down and scrolling down on a computer through pages with GIANT fonts and very little on them … Janet does not.) Give it a try over at the Champagne Campus.

With the return of summer, it’s time to bring out the rosé. You might find these infographics on VinePair fun, from 10 Shades of Rosé to maps charting who in the world drinks the most rosé and how its popularity has grown in the United States.

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Wine News 28 April – 5 May

May already? As always, May came in with a flurry of celebrations, from May Day and the Kentucky Derby to Britain’s three-day bank holiday and today’s Cinco de Mayo. Hope you’re enjoying the busy spring — we certainly are!

And here are the wine stories that caught our attention this week!

There’s a new crowdfunding site called Cruzu which is specifically for wine-related projects. If you’re feeling flush and in a giving mood, check out what’s on offer.

Here’s a news item for the history buffs: What was the best wine to drink in the Middle Ages? You can begin your investigations here.

And yet again thieves strike the wine industry. Someone stole £100,000 from the Basingstoke warehouse of Berry Brothers & Rudd by cutting through a wall.

Here’s some good news in advance of English Wine Week, which will take place later this month: Waitrose reports its sales of English wine have increased 95%.

And finally, in this week’s wine science, the identification of unique proteins may make it possible to identify grapes infected by Botrytis cinerea (noble rot). Who cares, you ask? Well, makers of Amarone care, because it may make the job of separating desirable withered grapes and undesirable botrytis-withered grapes much easier.

Wine News 14-21 April

Whether you are looking for upcoming events, feel a bit scientific, or want to dig in to some of wine’s controversial topics, this week we have you covered!

London Wine Week (18-24 May) is just around the corner. Wristbands are already on sale for £10 and you can keep up with the latest information on the website or by following @LDNWineWeek on Twitter.

If you aren’t near London, English Wine Week is coming up from Saturday 23 May to Sunday 31 May. Events will take place all over the country and you can get information about what’s going on in your area on the English Wine Producers website.

In previous years, International Sherry Week followed hot on the heels of London Wine Week and English Wine Week, but the celebration has been renamed Sherry Wine Week this year and shifted to 2-8 November 2015. You can go to the Sherry Wine Week website and subscribe to the newsletter if you want to keep up with the latest news.

English Sparkling Wine Day will apparently be celebrated on St. George’s Day on 23 May 2015. We believe this may be the first year English sparkling has been celebrated, so if you are so inclined, get out there and try some of the best bubbly the South of England has to offer. A peculiar twist of fate means we’ll actually be at an Australian wine tasting on the day, but we tasted 2010 Ridgeview Fitzrovia Rosé, 2011 Ridgeview Bloomsbury, and 2009 Nyetimber Brut Classic Cuvée last year during English Wine Week and posted our notes. The 2010 Ridgeview Fitzrovia Rosé is a particular favourite of ours, so if you’re looking for an English sparkling wine to try, you might start there.

Will Lyons has written an article for the Wall Street Journal on Bordeaux’s Château Lafleur, Pomerol’s tiny, family-owned wine powerhouse.

Researchers at the University of Queensland have discovered the success of Pinot Noir may be down to its ability to incorporate virus DNA into its own genes and evolve.

If you’re looking for a wine adventure in London, the Wine Sleuth recently attended one of the twice monthly tastings held in the 380-year-old wine cellar of the Stafford Hotel in St. James in Central London.

The Academic Wino weighs up the pros and cons of the Ganimede fermentation method and the traditional fermentation method used for red wine.

On Wine Shout you can read about Italy’s Alto Adige DOC and the 2013 Lagrein from Elena Walch Family Estates.

On Wine-Searcher Jason Wilson argues that the intense Summer of Riesling campaign that has dominated Riesling press in the United States for years has actually done more harm than good in promoting Riesling, primarily because sommeliers are still pushing sweet Rieslings.

A cache of the oldest known bottles of Ruinart Champagne have been unearthed in a cellar in Alsace.

In the Guardian David Williams asks why people get so cross about natural wine, while Alice Feiring tries to separate fad from future in natural wine.

There’s a peculiar new infographic from Jacob’s Creek making the rounds to help you match food and wine. Some of these wines aren’t the first we would have suggested, but then some of the foods aren’t either — Sea salt and balsamic vinegar crisps? “Gourmet” Scotch eggs?

One last note, in case you missed it last week: Daniel attended a staff tasting of some of the wines of Famille Hugel in Alsace. Not surprisingly, given that he loves Hugel wines and Alsatian wines in general, he was impressed. You can read the details here.